How to fly to Galapagos

 How to fly to Galapagos

To get to the Galápagos, you must take a flight to either of Ecuador’s two international airports, located at Quito and Guayaquil.

From the USA , there are direct/nonstop flights to Quito or Guayaquil from New York, Houston, Atlanta and Miami.

There are also some Latin American carriers, including Copa and LACSA.

The flight time to Ecuador is about four hours from Miami and five hours from Houston and Atlanta.

It should be noted that several of the regional airlines, including Aerogal, Taca, and LACSA, have merged with Avianca.

From Canada , most flights connect through US gateway cities.

From Europe you can flight in Iberia, AirEuropa or KLM.

Galapagos Travel Basics

Galapagos Travel Basics

This article provides the detailed, practical information that is useful to anyone planning a trip to the Galápagos Islands.

As a general rule, changes in the Galápagos can occur daily and there is often no way to predict them until they happen.

National government elections can bring in a leader with a different agenda.

The Director of the Galápagos National Park and the Galápagos Marine Reserve can be replaced unexpectedly, leaving projected programs up in the air or changing existing rules and regulations.

Everyone familiar with the Galápagos knows that what is true today may not be true tomorrow, and they must keep their feelers out at all times to be ready to adapt as modifications occur.

Likewise, visitors must always be aware of the real possibility of last minute changes.

Nevertheless, everything usually gets resolved in the end and the Galapagos is one of the most fascinating places on earth.

Tourists visit the Galápagos for a variety of reasons, including: diving, birding, general nature hikes, photography, and scientific research.

Most tourists opt for one of three basic kinds of tours: Day trips returning to the same hotel each night, hotel-based trips staying in lodgings on different islands, and live-aboard yachts/ships.

Because of recent Park Rules and restrictions, there is a great deal more emphasis on land-based tours, however to get the most out of your time in Galapagos, I would recommend a yacht/ship based trip.

When planning a trip to Galapagos, many people will use the services of an experienced travel company that truly understands Galapagos rather than attempting to book their trip on their own.

Many companies will claim to be experts in Galapagos when in reality they have little experience with the destination and no established connections in Ecuador.

The services of these companies are free to their clients as they are all paid a commission from the various operators in Galapagos.

Galapagos: People and language.

Galapagos: People  and language.

Many people don’t realize that there are five inhabited islands.

Santa Cruz, San Cristóbal, Isabela, Floreana, and Baltra have communities in small towns and a choice of restaurants, hotels cafes, shops and other services.

Baltra, controlled by the government because of the airport and naval base, has a group of residents, all involved with these facilities.

The majority of the present-day inhabitants moved to the islands from the Ecuadorian mainland since the 1950’s.

Legally, only official residents can work in the islands, where the major occupations are tourism, fishing and farming.

The Ecuadorian National Census of 2010 reported the Galápagos population at 25,124. Mostly lived in Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz.

There is now daily inter-island transportation between population centers.

Currently the majority of non-Ecuadorian tourists choose live-aboard yachts of various sizes for multi-day cruises that reach the more distant islands.

The official language in the Galapagos is Spanish, as it is in the rest of Ecuador.

Most residents involved in the tourism industry speak very good-to-excellent English.

The top-level guides are multilingual, but many of the other crewmembers on the yachts speak only Spanish.

Galapagos: El Niño and La Niña

Galapagos: El Niño and La Niña

El Nino/ La Nina El Nino is a disruption of the oceanic and atmospheric systems off the coast of South America that causes unusually warm water temperatures, a shift in the direction of the winds, changes in currents, and significantly increased rains.

The increased rainfall leads to destructive flooding in the eastern Pacific, while at the same time causing drought in the western Pacific, all the way to Australia.

Fishermen in Chile and Peru who noticed that the surface temperature of the coastal water Christmas Island and all the way up to California, in the USA.

Studies have shown that El Nino can last for periods of eighteen months or more, and that it returns, on average, every five to seven years.

La Nina, meaning “little girl,” refers to the opposite occurrence, a “cold event,” when water on the equator is unusually cold.

El Nino is predicted by monitoring changes in water temperature on the surface of the sea, wind conditions, and currents near Ecuador and Peru.

During El Nino, the trade winds slow in the central and western Pacific causing the warmest water to shift to the east, which in turn results in major changes in atmospheric changes around the globe forcing weather changes throughout the world.

When the warm water shifts east, the cold water thermocline layer near South America drops lower, sometimes reaching a depth of close to 150m (500ft).

The lack of nutrients causes reproduction at lower levels of the food web to decline, which rapidly affects the higher levels of the food web.

In Galapagos waters, hammerheads and other species move into deeper, cooler waters, corals bleach white and giant barnacles die.

On land, many seabird species don’t breed and populations of marine iguanas are severely reduced.

Land animals that feed on plant food do well during El Nino, however.

Galapagos giant tortoises grow more than usual because of the abundant vegetation.

2011 The devastating El Nino of 1982-83 saw almost six times as much rain as normal in the Galapagos and created a wildlife catastrophe.

Set off an explosion of plant growth that contributed to the spread of introduced species, such as fire ants and rats, which then attacked the endemic animals.

Seabirds, like this swallowtail gull, rely on food from the ocean to survive and are adversely affected by an El Nino event.

Instrumentation placed on Buoys in the Pacific Ocean after the 1982-1983 El Niño accurate data gathering.

Galapagos´ Climate

Galapagos´ Climate

Climate There are basically two seasons in the Galápagos.

The dry, garua season runs from late June to December, when it is relatively cool and dry with more overcast skies and occasional drizzle or mist (garua) during the day.

But this combination of conditions brings the breeding period for many sea birds and shorebirds, marine iguanas, sea lions and fur seals.

Late December to June is considered the hot or wet season, with March and April usually the hottest, wettest months.

Around December, the trade winds fall and the climatic equator (located north of the geographic equator) shifts south toward the Galápagos, causing the westward-flowing current to slow, reducing the upwelling and allowing warmer water from the Panama Current to invade the region.

Rain clouds form when the inversion layer breaks down, and the air warms and rises, resulting in daily afternoon showers.

They bathe the southern and central islands in cold water averaging 18°C (64°F).

The Cromwell Current is a deep-water current flowing eastward under the South Equatorial Current, which flows to the west.

It brings nutrient-rich water averaging 15°C (59°F), chilling Fernandina and the west coast of Isabela.

Warm water currents, including the Panama Current and the North Equatorial Current bring tropical waters.

Seasons are governed by changes in these oceanic currents and trade winds.

In the wet season, roughly December through June, the point of convergence is farther south, resulting in warmer waters in the central islands during the wet season.

The point of convergence is further north in the dry season, causing cooler waters in the central the Galapagos, with resultant water temperature in the southern islands averaging (18-20°C/ 64-68°F).

Special Law for the Conservation and Sustainable Use of the Galápagos

Special Law for the Conservation and Sustainable Use of the Galápagos

Ecuador enacted the Special Law for the Conservation and Sustainable Use of the Galápagos Province in 1998.

It prohibited further settlement on the islands, put controls on tourism and fishing, and discouraged introduction of foreign plant and animal species.

Non-native species, some of them introduced by accident over the centuries, threatened the survival of native Galápagos wildlife by competing for food, destroying conflicting interests among the various sectors such as tourism and fishing.

Organized tourism to the Galapagos began in the late 1960s.

The first live- aboard yacht, with accommodations for up to fifty-eight passengers, began cruising in 1970.

A master plan for tourism written in 1974 initially allowed a yearly maximum of 12,000 tourists.

Discussions have been constantly underway to implement evolving master plans to preserve the precious resources of the Galapagos National Park and Marine Reserve.

In 2011, the park director of the Galapagos Islands reported that there were over 173,000 visitors in 2010, a 6% increase over the previous year.

Roughly 75% of non-Ecuadorian visitors stayed on live-aboard vessels.

Visitor information cards (reporting general information including age and nationality).

Reports by ships on the number of tourists carried per trip, and 3.

Reports from the guides (stating number of tourists aboard, duration of trip and sites visited).

Galapagos´ History

Galapagos´ History

The Bishop of Panama, Fray Tomas de Berlanga, accidentally discovered the Galápagos archipelago on March 10, 1535 when his vessel drifted off course on its way from Panama to Peru.

His report to King Charles V of Spain included descriptions of iguanas, sea lions, ‘silly birds’ (probably blue-footed boobies) and the giant tortoise come from the Spanish word for “saddle,” perhaps referring to the shape of the shell of the “saddleback” tortoise.

Some historians believe that Indian inhabitants of South America possibly knew of the islands' existence before 1535, and Norwegian explorer Thor Heyerdahl discovered what he thought were pre-Columbian pottery shards on the islands in 1953, lending credence to this theory, but there are no definite records and the evidence remains inconclusive.

For more than three hundred years after the discovery of the archipelago, a succession of pirates, adventurers and whalers used the Galápagos as a base.

The islands provided sheltered anchorage, firewood, water and an abundance of fresh food thanks to the giant tortoises.

Adventurers made the first rough charts of the archipelago by the late 1600's, and scientific exploration began in the late 18th century.

Charles Darwin, possibly the Galápagos' most famous visitor, dropped anchor from his ship, the Beagle, in 1835.

Based on the notes and wildlife collections made during his five-week stay, he developed his theory of evolution and his explanation of the origin of the species.

His works spawned the creation–evolution controversy, a recurring history of the universe and of life on this planet.

Ecuador officially claimed the Galápagos Archipelago in 1832.

The remaining 3% consists of inhabited towns and farm lands.

Twenty years later, in 1979, UNESCO declared the Galápagos a World Heritage Site, and in 1986 the Galápagos Marine Resources Reserve was established to include protection of the waters around the archipelago.

The islands were also declared a Whale Sanctuary in 1990.

The Galápagos Islands are surrounded by Deep Ocean

The Galápagos Islands are surrounded by Deep Ocean.

The Galápagos Islands are completely surrounded by Deep Ocean.

Less than 20km (13 mi) off the coasts of the western islands, the ocean is over 300m (1000 ft) deep.

Indeed, some of the oldest volcanoes are completely submerged, like the Carnegie Ridge, a submerged mountain range stretching east from the Galápagos half way to the mainland.

It includes the remnants of some previous volcanic islands that are possibly nine million years old.

When an eruption occurs, the molten basalt disgorges in a lava flow rather than in an explosive blast that discharges cinder and ash to form a cone-shaped volcano.

Galapagos islands' formation

Galapagos islands' formation

Geologists generally use two interconnected theories to explain the islands' formation.

The Plate Tectonics Theory holds that the earth's crust consists of several rigid plates that, over time, move relative to one another over the surface of the earth.

The Galápagos lie on the northern edge of the Nazca Plate (which drifts to the southeast), close to its junction with the Cocos Plate (which drifts to the north).

As a result, the Galápagos as a whole are moving slowly to the southeast.

Interestingly, the islands do not age uniformly either.

The western islands are younger, contain very active volcanoes, and are still in the process of formation, while the eastern and southern islands are older.

This phenomenon is explained by the Hot Spot Theory of Geological Formation.

It holds that deep within the earth, below the moving tectonic plates, certain superheated areas remain stationary.

Subsequently, natural forces such as wind and rain cause erosion, and the top of the volcano may eventually collapse.

The Galapagos´ Humid Zone

The Galapagos´s Humid Zone

The Highland (humid) Zone is defined by the lush evergreen forest and scalesia trees as tall as 10m (33ft) that thrive in the mist.

Humid areas are much wider on the southern or windward sides, at altitudes of 300-700m (1000-2300ft).

At the highest elevations, the moist, dense forest turns into treeless upland areas covered with ferns and grasses.

The Galápagos Islands are relatively young in the Earth’s overall geological time line, and their formation is an ongoing process.

The region is still volcanically active, with over 50 eruptions recorded since discovery of the islands in 1535.

The most recent eruption of Cerro Azul on Isabela began May 28, 2008, followed by an eruption on the westernmost island, Fernandina, in April 2009.

Geologists generally use two interconnected theories to explain the islands' formation.

The Plate Tectonics Theory holds that the earth's crust consists of several rigid plates that, over time, move relative to one Geologists generally use two interconnected theories to explain the islands' formation.

The Plate Tectonics Theory holds that the earth's crust consists of several rigid plates that, over time, move relative to one another over the surface of the earth.

The Galápagos lie on the northern edge of the Nazca Plate (which drifts to the southeast), close to its junction with the Cocos Plate (which drifts to the north).

The Galapagos´Arid Zone

The Galapagos´Arid Zone



The Arid Zone, a wide area of lava, cinder and ash, exists up to about 200m (656ft).

Bartolomé is an example of an Arid Zone island.

The Highland (humid) Zone is defined by the lush evergreen forest and scalesia trees as tall as 10m (33ft) that thrive in the mist.

Humid areas are much wider on the southern or windward sides, at altitudes of 300-700m (1000-2300ft).

At the highest elevations, the moist, dense forest turns into treeless upland areas covered with ferns and grasses.

The Galápagos Islands are relatively young in the Earth’s overall geological time line, and their formation is an ongoing process.

The region is still volcanically active, with over 50 eruptions recorded since discovery of the islands in 1535.

The most recent eruption of Cerro Azul on Isabela began May 28, 2008, followed by an eruption on the westernmost island, Fernandina, in April 2009.

HUMBOLDT EXPLORER AVAILABILITY 2018



HUMBOLDT EXPLORER AVAILABILITY 2018


HUMBOLDT EXPLORER
2018 
PRICE: $5095 
June 4-11- 1 male share, 1 female share
June 18-25- 6 spaces special price $3595 per person
July 30-Aug 6 – 1 female share
August 13-20- 1 cabins, 1 female share
Sept 3-10- 1 male share, 1 cabin $5095+$180 special itinerary
Oct 1-8 – 1 male share $5095 + $160 special itinerary
October 15-22- 1 female share
Oct 29- Nov 5 – 1 female share, 1 male share
Dec 24- 31, 2018 open
Dec 31- Jan 7 open
PHONE: +593999172235

Contact Us:
Galapagos Island Operator Mail Galasam Messenger Galapagos Diving Operator Whatsapp

Follow US:
Galasam Facebook   Galasam Twitter   Galasam Instagram   Galasam Youtube  Galasam Linkedin

Copyright Galasam Group

Subscribe Us

Translate